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Posts Tagged ‘tactile interpreters’


 

You can find all of my articles including those on the now-closed Homeschool Mosaics site at Tactile View.org . The adventures of my life in the Dark Silence continues there with a few surprises, too. Follow along! I would love to see there.

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My purpose in posting this on Homeschool Mosaics was not to just brag about my younger son’s wedding day (which you know we, parents like to do) because if you aren’t involved in the wedding it can be boring hearing about it in great detail, but I wanted to give people a glimpse into my way of experiencing a memorable event, the hard work that tactile ASL interpreters have to do, and the importance of SSPs, interpreters, and people willing to understand the needs of the DeafBlind. I am sharing it now with you, my friends, in the hopes that you will enjoy it, too. Everybody told me they cried, which wasn’t my intent LOL, but I will give you fair warning that some say you might need tissues handy.http://homeschoolmosaics.com/the-wedding/

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Today, I write about ASL interpreters, the heroes to me and many other Deaf and DeafBlind individuals. They train to provide the best interpretation of information in the form of words to the beautiful images found only on the hands and in the minds of those who understand the language of the hands. There are many kinds of heroes in this world. I share how ASL interpreters are true heroes to me. I hope you will read today’s post on Homeschool Mosaics and understand just how special these hard-working people are and how they contribute so much to many. http://homeschoolmosaics.com/interpreters-a-special-kind-of-hero/

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There are a lot of awesome things on Homeschool Mosaics this month about the holidays in regards to giving, remembering the importance of family, and including the Special Needs members. My column is all about how to include them in the upcoming festivities including the DeafBlind, so please check it out and think about those you may need to think about and how you need to do that to have the best holiday season for everyone!

http://homeschoolmosaics.com/include-your-special-needs-family-friends-in-your-holiday-gatherings/

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Touch Points
By Renée K. Walker
It is a new year as I write this column. I am thankful for so many blessings in my life and the ability to find ways to still be productive despite being deaf and blind. I think we all want that for ourselves. The New Year coming also gives us time for reflecting on what we want to change about ourselves and our lives. Often, we keep our reflections to beneficial but more surface aspects such as losing a few pounds or starting a new hobby or learning to lead a less busy life. After a hectic year of fighting some of the usual DeafBlind issues such as needing interpreters for doctor visits and being included in social and family events, I couldn’t help but remember the many comments made to me from readers of this column and comments from others in other DeafBlind venues on forums or Facebook. The common thread I heard was about negative attitudes among not just the hearing/sighted members but also those of other disabled people even DeafBlind people. That saddens me. I, too, have felt the negative attitudes and had hoped my experiences were isolated. For these reasons, my reflections this year turned more outward than inward with the desire of change being for all of us.
The comments seem to relate similar incidents as my own, so I will mention just a few here. I am sure you can relate to a few and add your own. I have encountered the usual hearing/sighted issues that you have read about even here before, but the ones that distress me the most come from other disabled especially other DeafBlind. Many Deaf will not socialize with me except through an interpreter. They actually fear the touch of tactile ASL. A few have even expressed their displeasure that ASL is even used by the DeafBlind at all since these few think it should only be a visual language. Then there are the blind and other disabled who also have disabled parking permits as I do complain that I don’t look handicapped, so I should walk like everyone else. I have my reasons and have had a permit longer than I have been both deaf and blind. It had nothing to do with vision or hearing issues. I do still prefer to use it even for those reasons because of my safety and the safety of my guide dog as I try to harness him and often have almost been hit just trying to get us both out of the vehicle. There are also the few totally blind who feel that those who have some vision shouldn’t be considered part of their group because the ones with some vision still don’t know what it is like to have no sight. Then there are the few Deaf and some DeafBlind who are culturally Deaf and feel that only native ASL signers can be culturally Deaf. I have been deaf since a young child, but I learned to speak and the oral method was the only method available to me because there was no Deaf community near me in the places that we lived as I grew up. You can’t learn what isn’t there, but that doesn’t make my experiences as a deaf child that much different from others except possibly more difficult, since I didn’t have a visual language to build on or a family or community in which I could full participate. Now that I know ASL and wish to practice it more to fluency, I find it disheartening when a DeafBlind person literally pushes my hands away because they realize I am not a native speaker, and they decide they do not wish to have further contact with me. The DeafBlind community is already very small and widely dispersed. When we often don’t fit in with the Deaf community, you would think that we would be happy to share with any other DeafBlind person, since many of us claim that isolation and loneliness are friends we have that we prefer not to have.
My experiences are similar to many others. These experiences are like walls being placed around me keeping me contained in room that seems to grow smaller. Truthfully, I have referred to these experiences as being with negative attitudes, but they are actually nothing more than outright prejudices. A person can be more than just racially prejudiced. Prejudice doesn’t have limitations. Anyone can be prejudiced, and they can be prejudiced about many different things and people. These prejudices against people who don’t sign or didn’t sign until later, who are not totally blind, who don’t look disabled, or others are dividing a small group into even smaller groups and causing even more pain than the society as a whole that tends to ignore us at best. It is often easier to cope with pain from outsiders than from those who are the same or similar. You would also expect that people who have been hurt by others because they are different would have more compassion for others who are different. Sadly, that isn’t always the case. Humans are capable of much pain to each other, and sometimes those who have been hurt can inflict even more on the ones around them.
In addition to the pain caused and the barriers of further isolation that are created, the disabled group that could stand together as one and have a louder and stronger voice is weakened to the point of being inaudible and useless. The good we could achieve for everyone as a whole is diminished to nothing. The one group is broken into so many small slivers that there are too few fighting for a specific issue. As one, we could fight with a strong, loud voice for many issues that would benefit us all. But, no, we can’t do that because we are too full of anger at another who is slightly different to recognize that the other is actually more like us that we could be the same.
Damage caused to our voice by these prejudices is great, and the good we could achieve will continue to be weak and slow. The pain that we cause each other will continue to isolate us more and more until we each stand alone. Does that sound like a future that anyone of us would want? Do we even really want to wish that on someone else just because they are a little different from us?
Reflect on your own attitudes as this year begins to move into Spring, the season of newness. You may not be one of the few are among the ones mentioned here. It is good that I can say it is the “few,” but unfortunately, the few can cause much dissension and create enough chaos amongst the many that little can be achieved. If the few can see that their attitudes are no different and no less harmful than the prejudices of racism to our society and work toward new and positive attitudes toward others, change for good can happen. If the many can be willing to lovingly stand against the prejudices of the few to show that there is a better way, the disabled can come together and work for a brighter future filled with the ability to be independent and productive. I am only one person, but it can start with one. Who will join me?
If you have comments about this topic, you may write a letter in braille or print to Renée Walker, 143 Williamson Dr, Macon, GA 31210; or you may email me at rkwalker@wynfieldca.org. You can also read and comment on my blog at http://www.deafblindhope.wordpress.com. You can also check me out at http://www.facebook.com/reneekwalker.

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Well, the weather has been frightful, but I have seen more snow than I have ever seen before. Joey has never seen snow before. We had a ball playing in it. Joey running and sliding and I throwing snow over him. He likes to try and catch it.

Joey in the snow making shadows.

"Joey in the snow making shadows."

Snow in the HKNC yard

"Snow in the HKNC yard"


Training has been more practice of all that I have learned so far. I talk in sign everywhere pretty much. Tactual is still my best mode. In most classes, we are doing the final goals and filling out requistions for my state to authorize payment. I don’t know if my state will pay for everything I need or not, but I hope and pray they do.

Jesus has been at work this week through me. I just hope I rose to the occasion as He wanted me to do. One of my instructors actually came to me after hours and asked me to tell her about Jesus. I was ecstatic. How lovely it was to share my love and experiences with her. In case you are wondering, this is not the same person that I have spoken of before. That person is saved and I can tell the person has faith. Jesus has something for that person to do and needs to prepare. The instructor that came to me this week is not from a religious family. She doesn’t know Christ and isn’t even sure there is a God. I hope that I answered her questions, but I hope even more that Jesus was able to work through my answers. I am praying mightily for her to feel Jesus. I can tell that the Holy Spirit is calling her. I just pray that she will accept that call.

We also had a holiday party that was actually a Deaf party. It was fun, but loud. I turned everything off and I left Joey at the center with my friend, Ginger. Basically, they have these very large speakers and some are turned down on the floor so that you feel the vibrations through the floor, tables, everything. I could feel the vibrations all through my body. The Deaf use the vibrations to dance by. It was very interesting.

A friend, Peter, in his Christmas tux and his SSP, Carol.

"A friend, Peter, in his Christmas tux and his SSP, Carol."

Saturday, we had another party at a Sportsman’s Lodge near the Long Island Marina. We at HKNC were invited, but it was mostly for the many special needs children from the area. I loved watching the children and adults of various ages with various forms of mental retardation playing and laughing. They all loved Santa and were so appreciative of the hand-knitted afghans we all got. I was too. Mine was a gorgeous lavender, purple, and pink coloration. I really couldn’t see the colors, but the staff described it to me very well. I like those colors. Many of the children wanted to pet Joey. Some were afraid of him, but as usual Joey was perfect with each and every one. He always seems to know how to act. With those who were afraid, he laid down next to them and let them reach to him. With others, he reached up and gave a big “Joey kiss” which is very special, you know. The children’s faces shined as Joey poured out his love for all of them. The others danced for a while. I enjoyed seeing everyone loving moving their bodies to the music in any way they could. I, of course, can always measure my fun level on a scale of 1 to full blown asthma attack. The party made it to full blown asthma attack. Lovely… Actually, what happened was I didn’t know that the lodge allows smoking in the building where they have a bar in the back. There was no smoking at the time, but I can’t be around it at all, so after a couple of hours I couldn’t breathe. We did a nebulizer treatment in the van on the way back to the center. I did a couple upon my return. I eventually got better without going to the hospital. I was very thankful. I have had enough of hospitals for a long while.

Here is the HKNC Christmas tree in the lobby. Next to it is the large paining done by a former totally deaf and blind student. The picture depicts the scene where Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan are at the well with water running over Helen’s hand as “Teacher” as Helen called Anne, fingerspelled “W-A-T-E-R” into Helen’s other hand. Helen’s says this is the moment that her world became alive with the true understanding of language.

HKNC's Christmas tree in the Lobby along with the painting by a DeafBlind student of "Helen's Well.

"HKNC's Christmas tree in the Lobby along with the painting by a DeafBlind student of Helen at the well.

This is a close-up view of that painting of Helen Keller at the well learning "W-A-T-E-R".

"This is a close-up view of that painting of Helen Keller at the well learning "W-A-T-E-R".

It began to snow late Saturday night and continued all day Sunday. I got to go to church with my friend and HKNC interpreter, Jessica. Jessica is 24 years old, but very spiritually wise. Her parents and Jesus have done a wonderful job with her. Jessica is Pentecostal, so her church service was a little bit louder than the ones at my Baptist Church. I loved it though. I couldn’t hear the music, so it was hard for me to worship like I normally do. Jessica though tactually signed everything for almost 3 hours so that I could experience things. That may not sound like a big deal to you guys, but interpreting is very tiring mentally and physically. Tactual sign is even more demanding. The interpreters have very strict regulations for when they are working. At HKNC, they do interpreter switches about every 30 mins or so, because it is so demanding of them. Jessica interpreted for me almost continually for about 3 hours. I asked her about half way through if she wanted a break, but she said she was fine. Jessica never complained. That was very special to me.

Well, the good news is that I am beginning my last week here. I don’t know when my flight is yet, but I hope it is Friday, 21st or Saturday morning at the latest. I will update here as soon as I know. That will probably be my last blog, too, since I will have to pack and ship everything before I leave out. The experience has been wonderful, and I have learned so very much. I have friends that I can call lifelong friends, as well. However, I am ready to get home. I have family, friends, and students to get home to. Things will be different, though. Signing has become my main mode of communication, so I hope a few of my close friends are willing to learn some. I am going to need an SSP or Support Services Provider, too. Hopefully, we can find someone to fill that role. Anyway, more on that after Christmas. I just want to get home now. Little Joey wants to play with his sister and brothers and give Daddy a big wet kiss. I do, too.

Take care, everyone!

Renee’ and Little Joey

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I have been unable to post for a while now. I became sicker and sicker with my asthma. I had a migraine for the week after Thanksgiving working on a speech I had been asked to do as keynote speaker for a technology seminar. I never got to give it, unfortunately. Saturday afternoon, I was found on my bed semi-conscious. I had evidently gotten up and tried to ask for help earlier, but I don’t remember it. Little Joe kept trying to push me up and licking my face. His urgency is what got me moving at all I am sure. I spent Saturday thru Wednesday in the hospital with pneumonia and exacerbation of asthma. I had IV antibiotics and IV steroids. I was back at HKNC for 5 hours when they had to return me to the hospital. I came back the next day. I am still confined to my bed and unable to speak because I don’t have enough air, but it is getting better slowly. I am still on steroids. I will say that my signing is getting much better because I have no choice, but to sign everything. I also was unable to hear anything since being profoundly deaf, I have to concentrate to understand. I was totally unable to do that. The hospital had to bring in a tactual sign language interpreter for me. I was able to do it fortunately. God does provide in all things. Pray for me as my chest still hurts and I am still wheezing.

Thank you Jesus for Little Joey.

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