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Posts Tagged ‘deaf’


 

You can find all of my articles including those on the now-closed Homeschool Mosaics site at Tactile View.org . The adventures of my life in the Dark Silence continues there with a few surprises, too. Follow along! I would love to see there.

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I had an article go live on my Home and School Mosaics magazine on Dec. 29. Well, I was still on Christmas break, so I couldn’t post it. Today, it is back to work, so it is my first task of the day to post this article. Getting back to work after the break isn’t easy, but I hope you enjoy my article about babies learning ASL making your first days back to a normal a little better. It seems many parents teach their babies ASL signs as well as Spanish or French numbers, colors, and basic words. I recently saw another story about a celebrity teaching her child ASL starting shortly after birth. It seems to be the thing to do. I got confused, though, when I met or consulted online with hearing parents with Deaf or DeafBlind children who were now afraid to teach their child ASL. The reasons were varied. I wanted to know if the reasons were valid or based on fear, so I did some research. This post is about what I learned and now want to recommend to all parents. Let me know what you think.

Don’t Throw Out the Baby with ASL 

http://homeschoolmosaics.com/dont-throw-out-the-baby-with-asl/

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I have been working for months and probably longer informally to learn new music. Music has and always will be a very important part of my life. Many Deaf people can’t understand that, but some do. I love how it makes me feel physically, emotionally, and mentally. Problem was that I couldn’t learn new music, so I sought to change that. The results I wrote in an article that went live today on Home and School Mosaics. I am putting myself out there for the world to see, not just on Home and School Mosiacs, but YouTube, too. That is a little scary because people could think I am seeking attention, but that is totally false. I hadn’t thought of sharing until so many people (without hearing me) insisted that I should to show what disable/handicapped people can do. I do share that now for that reason only and for the glory of my Lord and Savior. Don’t expect an amazing performance because my voice is just normal. Do expect to be shown that DeafBlind people can do and learn many things. Singing is just one of them. It really doesn’t matter if they learn to sing or not. It is only important to know that everyone can get something from music including the DeafBlind.

Please enjoy it for the purposes it was intended. ASL version is also provided.

http://homeschoolmosaics.com/music-for-deafblind-ears/

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My purpose in posting this on Homeschool Mosaics was not to just brag about my younger son’s wedding day (which you know we, parents like to do) because if you aren’t involved in the wedding it can be boring hearing about it in great detail, but I wanted to give people a glimpse into my way of experiencing a memorable event, the hard work that tactile ASL interpreters have to do, and the importance of SSPs, interpreters, and people willing to understand the needs of the DeafBlind. I am sharing it now with you, my friends, in the hopes that you will enjoy it, too. Everybody told me they cried, which wasn’t my intent LOL, but I will give you fair warning that some say you might need tissues handy.http://homeschoolmosaics.com/the-wedding/

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Well, my article for my monthly column on Homeschool Mosaics went live on Friday, but I had a product review due for Mosaics Reviews that day, too, that I had to pass along. So, I am sharing my article for Homeschool Mosaics today. This is part 2 of my three part series on Cochlear Implants. This month, I am answering the question that I am asked repeatedly, “Why do I get a CI?” I hope you will check out my answer. I am attempting to show how this decision is very personal and and individual. No one, not even a doctor, can really decide this issue for someone else. Understanding from the Deaf community, DeafBlind community, and yes, even the Hearing community is desperately needed to help these people and families facing this decision to be better informed and more comfortable living with their decision. Please read!

http://homeschoolmosaics.com/cochlear-implants-not-for-me/

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This month at Homeschool Mosaics I begin a three-part series on Cochlear Implants. I try to tell you the Good, the Bad, and the ugly of it all. I worked hard researching all the facts again to allow everyone to make their own choice. It doesn’t matter if you are Deaf, deaf, hard of hearing, DeafBlind, hearing and sighted. The more you know about things the better we can support one another when it comes to this controversial topic. Check it out! http://homeschoolmosaics.com/cochlear-implants-the-good-the-bad/

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It is my day on Homeschool Mosaics again. In fact, with all the reviews I have been working on lately, I missed posting here about my column last month, so check this one out about what is happening in the world of ASL interpreting. http://homeschoolmosaics.com/advances-in-asl-interpreting-good-or-bad/

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This is a very interesting look into the world of DeafBlindness from a hearing blind who was DeafBlind for a while and now works with the DeafBlind community.Toward the end, she gives detailed descriptions of hearing ASL, hearing where people are by footsteps, how big a room is, etc. I know those things, too, but not from sound. I feel how big a room is by the amount of airflow and backflow from the air “echoing” off walls at different distances. I can feel people near me signing and can sometimes catch a sign or two by the vibrations of hands meeting. I feel the air move when people walk, and the floor vibrate when people walk, and the vibration of a cane against a door or a wall. I enjoy music by feeling. I agree with her that DeafBlindness isn’t the end of good things. I just experience them differently. The lady also got how I feel when hearing people tire of trying to communicate with me and say, “Never mind.” Or, a Deaf or DB who has signed for most of life tires of my slower, sloppier sign and slaps my hands away. So, check out the latest article on DeafBlind Think tank:

http://dbtt.org/being-deaf-blind-in-the-hearing-world/

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Thinkwell is an online math education site. I have heard so much about it that I thought I would try it out. I wanted to see if it was accessible for the deaf, blind, and deafblind. I also wanted to see if the program would be suitable for an accredited umbrella program that required the parent-teacher to submit documentation such as copies of tests and grades for credit. I had heard from many that it covered several age levels from middle school through high school and Advanced Placement and college level, too. While educationally, it might not be a suitable option for everyone, the program is high quality and proves beneficial to many.

While, I may not be discussing the academic portions of this program, I will quickly describe it to you. There are numerous chapters in each course covering a full curriculum of objectives for each course. Each chapter has a video lecture followed by practice assignments, a quiz, and a chapter test. There are also interactive activities for added interest, practice, and enrichment. Along with that, you will also find printable worksheet type exercises for off-line practice, too.  A fellow contributing writer and co-founder of Homeschool Mosaics reviewed this site a few months ago following actually using the programs for two years with her own son. You can get her educated opinion by reading her review on Homeschool Mosaics here:  http://homeschoolmosaics.com/thinkwell-for-math/ .

Now, let me tell you what I found out in regards to accessibility and umbrella programs. Although, the site isn’t totally accessible to a braille display, I was impressed by how much the site developers did try to consider handicapped students. Their lecture videos which are the key to the program are closed captioned. You can turn them on from the buttons at the bottom of the video window. In addition, I was shocked to see that they had a complete print transcript of the video’s audio with detailed descriptions of the examples written on a chalkboard in the video. This would make it very easy for a hearing blind student to follow the video during play. It also would make it possible for a blind student to use a screen reader to read the transcript for the video to further understand the teacher’s lecture. A deaf student could also use the transcript to augment the closed captioning, if needed, since the problem examples are described well. In addition, the transcript file is a text .pdf making it accessible to a braille display, too, so a deafblind student could use this transcript to access the all-important teacher lecture. I highly commend the site developers for taking this much needed, but rare extra step to add accessibility to the site. Normally, the deafblind student would not have the ability to use a site at all even if a transcript is provided, since most provide image-based rather than text-based .pdf files. The practice worksheets, quizzes, and tests that I have mentioned that follow each video lecture are also available in two formats:  the online, computer checked format and the .pdf format. There is no audio connected with the practice tests, quizzes or tests, so a deaf student can easily take the on-line test to receive their results. A hearing blind student can possible do the on-line format with the screen reader. I can’t verify that because I am DeafBlind, so I am unsure if the screen reader is voicing the on-line version. Regardless, the .pdf format of the worksheets, quizzes, and tests are also text-based instead of image-based, so a braille display will be able to read these. To facilitate this use, open the on-line version and let the student orally answer or open .pdf version , print,  and use a braille and slate to record the answers for these assignments. The teacher can then use the on-line format to record the student’s answers for computer grading and record-keeping.  This is definitely an easy way to do the program for the blind and deafblind. There are some animated flash interactive activities that are not accessible for blind and deafblind and possibly not to the deaf for the ones that have audio that is needed for completing the task. However, these are enrichment activities that are not critically needed to ensure successful completion of the courses. Although the blind and deafblind can’t do the entire site independently, the quality of the education is high, and there is sufficient access along with a simple step for modification to make this program a beneficial choice to those students who are already good with using a computer with a screen reader and/or braille display. So, if you need or want an on-line choice for your student’s math curriculum, Thinkwell is a beneficial option to try.

In addition to usable access for the disabled, Thinkwell pleases me as Principal of an accredited homeschool umbrella program, too. Regardless to whether the program is a divided home/center program or a home only program such as mine for the most part, Thinkwell has the capability to fit your documentation and contact hour requirements. The courses cover objectives for each subject and level well with suitable instruction and practice for a typical school year. All assignments can be printed as blank assignments to be used for on-site observation, as needed. Completed on-line activities can be printed with answers to show correct/incorrect questions specifically, as well as, the overall grade on the assignment. In addition, there is a suitable number of activities to allow for the programs that meet one, two, or three days a week and allow for practice at home through practice worksheets and interactive activities, as needed. Since there are also courses that are Advanced Placement level, students in these programs have access to AP materials that can be difficult for some students to obtain easily or affordably. Some colleges also use Thinkwell to provide actual college courses for them, so that adds to the evidence that Thinkwell provides quality instruction with a high quality content level, too.

A twelve month subscription to Thinkwell is $125-$150 for full year, full credit course, but there are many places that provide discount codes if you look for them. Either way, it isn’t too bad for a high quality program that is accessible and suitable for many accredited umbrella programs, too. You can find out more at http://www.thinkwellhomeschool.com/.

 

I was not asked by Thinkwell or anyone else to review this program. I chose it to review to provide options for disabled students and students involved in umbrella programs. I did use their advertised free trial to gain access to the program as any consumer can do. I have not and will not be compensated in any way for this review. The review expresses my honest opinion of this program.

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I seldom get truly upset these days. Age mellows you, I guess. The last several weeks, though, I have been increasingly frustrated on Sunday mornings. I have tried several different time frames from early morning to early afternoon on various local stations and satellite looking for Christian worship services that are closed captioned. During the week, you can find many Christian network programs and even on regular network programs at certain times that involve Bible teaching and Christian lifestyle programs. I love these, but I also want to worship like I did at Church most of my life. Yes, I can worship in many different ways, in different places, and at different times. I still want to watch a good Church program, though, especially on Sunday. For many years, I have watched a service at a local church that I used to attend. For financial reasons they changed networks recently. I watched the program on the new station this Sunday. I couldn’t understand a thing. I sat close, but I couldn’t find the very fuzzy words at all. I sat and watched the grayish and reddish screen flicker and hoped that I would at least see captions when the pastor spoke. It never happened. I was disappointed.

Then I was angry. Closed captioning is very important to Deaf and Hard of Hearing people. Even I use it by reading very close. No, I don’t get everything, but I get enough. With Closed Captioning, I can watch TV shows and movies that others are watching and talking about which helps me to feel connected. More importantly, with Closed Captioning, I can learn from others about faith, love, and the ways to a better life through Christ. Closed Captioning is necessary for accessibility. The Deaf need the accessibility to the Hearing world. They need, I need, the access to the message of the Bible in this way, as well as the others I use. I have looked and found only Charles Stanley out of Atlanta who has partial captioning when the pastor speaks. The only full captions I have found have been on the LDS channel. They provide captions for the songs, message, and everything. I really prefer that. The words of the hymns and contemporary songs have a message themselves. I should be able to learn from the music, too. The problem with that is I don’t agree with the LDS, so that isn’t an option for me. It is a shame that other Christian denominations don’t seem to have the compassion for others as the LDS do, though.

Why does the Church not see the need for this? Too many pastors are saying it is because of the economy. Let me note here that Closed Captioning equipment and therefore, services, too, have been decreasing in costs in recent years, so lack of money can’t really be an excuse. Even if it is money, if Believers truly believed their Bibles, and if Believers truly lived the words they read, then the economic situation wouldn’t matter. Believers need to present the need to God, and then believe the word He promised to provide for all our needs. Truly, though, I see they have money for the things they really want to do and give to most often. Many brag of what they send to far, remote places to spread the Gospel. I think that is wonderful, but if there are those who are needy within your own back yard or even in your own house, why not put a priority there before you venture to far mission fields?

The Church in America, I believe, is failing in its mission. It isn’t about doing the Father’s business. All too often it has become its own business seeking money for its own agenda by catering to making people feel good. It isn’t about speaking the Truth. This shows as there isn’t enough faith to bring in the resources and to serve its members’ needs. Love is short when the faith is lacking. Wake up, Church!

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