Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘blog’


 

You can find all of my articles including those on the now-closed Homeschool Mosaics site at Tactile View.org . The adventures of my life in the Dark Silence continues there with a few surprises, too. Follow along! I would love to see there.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »


I seldom get truly upset these days. Age mellows you, I guess. The last several weeks, though, I have been increasingly frustrated on Sunday mornings. I have tried several different time frames from early morning to early afternoon on various local stations and satellite looking for Christian worship services that are closed captioned. During the week, you can find many Christian network programs and even on regular network programs at certain times that involve Bible teaching and Christian lifestyle programs. I love these, but I also want to worship like I did at Church most of my life. Yes, I can worship in many different ways, in different places, and at different times. I still want to watch a good Church program, though, especially on Sunday. For many years, I have watched a service at a local church that I used to attend. For financial reasons they changed networks recently. I watched the program on the new station this Sunday. I couldn’t understand a thing. I sat close, but I couldn’t find the very fuzzy words at all. I sat and watched the grayish and reddish screen flicker and hoped that I would at least see captions when the pastor spoke. It never happened. I was disappointed.

Then I was angry. Closed captioning is very important to Deaf and Hard of Hearing people. Even I use it by reading very close. No, I don’t get everything, but I get enough. With Closed Captioning, I can watch TV shows and movies that others are watching and talking about which helps me to feel connected. More importantly, with Closed Captioning, I can learn from others about faith, love, and the ways to a better life through Christ. Closed Captioning is necessary for accessibility. The Deaf need the accessibility to the Hearing world. They need, I need, the access to the message of the Bible in this way, as well as the others I use. I have looked and found only Charles Stanley out of Atlanta who has partial captioning when the pastor speaks. The only full captions I have found have been on the LDS channel. They provide captions for the songs, message, and everything. I really prefer that. The words of the hymns and contemporary songs have a message themselves. I should be able to learn from the music, too. The problem with that is I don’t agree with the LDS, so that isn’t an option for me. It is a shame that other Christian denominations don’t seem to have the compassion for others as the LDS do, though.

Why does the Church not see the need for this? Too many pastors are saying it is because of the economy. Let me note here that Closed Captioning equipment and therefore, services, too, have been decreasing in costs in recent years, so lack of money can’t really be an excuse. Even if it is money, if Believers truly believed their Bibles, and if Believers truly lived the words they read, then the economic situation wouldn’t matter. Believers need to present the need to God, and then believe the word He promised to provide for all our needs. Truly, though, I see they have money for the things they really want to do and give to most often. Many brag of what they send to far, remote places to spread the Gospel. I think that is wonderful, but if there are those who are needy within your own back yard or even in your own house, why not put a priority there before you venture to far mission fields?

The Church in America, I believe, is failing in its mission. It isn’t about doing the Father’s business. All too often it has become its own business seeking money for its own agenda by catering to making people feel good. It isn’t about speaking the Truth. This shows as there isn’t enough faith to bring in the resources and to serve its members’ needs. Love is short when the faith is lacking. Wake up, Church!

Read Full Post »


Touch Points

By Renée K. Walker

To be Allowed to Understand

Time for another touch point, and accessibility is still on my mind. Accessible technology is still a big interest, but this time I am thinking more about events and activities. I sit in this room in this chair at my computer trying to access the world so much that I really want to get out sometimes and do something. I did that recently and wanted to share how it went and how easy it can be if event organizers and businesses will just take the time to think about accessibility.

With the holidays approaching with gifts to buy and new resolutions to make, I decided to use some of my saved money to buy myself a gift, and hopefully, keep a New Year’s resolution to get active again. I joined a gym after finding a Support Services Provider (SSP) who could sign; I approached the largest gym facility here that is also a division of a medical facility to apply for membership. The first obstacle was to convince them that they had the responsibility to provide a qualified interpreter for some of my visits such as the first meeting and meetings with a personal trainer. It took a bit of effort, but after education and effort, an interpreter was provided. My first visit was good, though tense at first, as we initially went back and forth on how to best serve me. The facility requires someone to be with me at all times, but I in agreement with that. I am becoming more and more independent, but I still have anxiety issues when out in the public alone. Communication with staff was my biggest concern. Anytime I meet with my personal trainer, I get a qualified interpreter as mandated by the ADA law which specifically mentions gym facilities. For most days, I now can get around independently even if someone else is not with me because we took plenty of time with staff initially to orient me to every inch of the building and its facilities. The staff didn’t quite understand that at first, but they helped me graciously and found it was quite easy on their part. An SSP will provide the means for communication otherwise, if the need arises. I also opted to have massage therapy (my favorite part, of course) provided, too. This was the part that I was most worried about. Apart from the apprehension one might feel with the touching initially, I was most concerned about communication because it isn’t a setting that they want another person in the room due to privacy concerns. The therapist works to keep you covered at all times, but as you move from front to back, someone sitting lower and to the side of you might see more than you want them, too. I understand that, but I was concerned with how the therapist would communicate or even if the therapist would be willing, since it has to all be done tactually. With the help of my interpreter, we developed a set of signs both ASL and made up signals that were easy for both the therapist to remember and me to understand. The therapist was perfectly willing, and the first session went very well. I loved the massage. My feeling of insecurity in regards to the touching quickly dissipated due to the procedures and professionalism of the therapist, and my body never felt so relaxed. I highly recommend it for anyone, but especially DeafBlind people who live stressful lives just because they are DeafBlind. I can say that I have been several times now to exercise and gotten one massage. Due to the understanding of the staff and my SSP, I will be able to keep this New Year’s resolution with the best Christmas present that I gave to myself.

Now my new experiences didn’t end with the gym. I decided that I wanted to experience some Christmas celebration again other than my own at- home celebration. First, I attended the local replica and live play called “Walk through Bethlehem” presented by a local church. This church already provides interpreting services for the deaf members of their congregation for church and other services including this activity. This year they provided two tactual interpreters to help take me through along with my family. The interpreters were wonderful and really helped me understand what was going on. I had attended this event several years ago as a sighted person who couldn’t hear, but I also couldn’t sign. I thought I understood everything. I know now that there was a lot of subtle and inspiring information in the various dialogues that I had totally missed without the ASL knowledge and interpreting. This year I also was provided tactile access to the event making the experience even more enjoyable and fulfilling. I was allowed to touch the fabricated city walls, Roman soldiers’ uniforms, bread and other foods, and the baby Jesus who was to my surprise a living child kicking his little feet in the manger. I touched the nose of a camel and felt the heat of an open fire. The actors made the extra effort to provide this access to me, not just my interpreters. Many told me later that they had never done anything like that before, but they thoroughly enjoyed the experience and learned a lot from it. I know that their effort was extremely beneficial to me and much appreciated.

My next event wasn’t as accessible as these other experiences, though. I attended my church’s Christmas Eve service which included music, message, and a live nativity. I knew before I went that accessibility would not be present. My church provides an interpreter for the Deaf for a Sunday morning service, and my Deaf friends copy the interpreter’s signs to me tactually. Sunday morning service is the only time my church considers providing access to their events for their Deaf members. I think they care, but I don’t think they fully understand the needs of me and other Deaf members. I attended because my hearing family members would enjoy the service as a part of our Christmas activities and as another means of keeping Christ the center of our celebrations which is important to us. I could feel the music from the full choir, orchestra, and band, but I had no other means to understand the message or experience the live nativity. My husband tried to help me get close to the nativity to help him at least better describe the scenario and possibly allow me to ask to touch what I could, but no one would let us even get close as they crowded to see for themselves. He couldn’t even see the actors or scenery to describe them to me. Of course, I knew this beforehand, so I did not complain, nor am I complaining now. My family enjoyed the event and worshipped through song, prayer, and message. I worshipped through the feel of the music and in my own thoughts and prayers. More importantly, I just enjoyed being there to share it with my family as opposed to waiting at home alone. Sometimes that is enough in light of the struggles of being DeafBlind.

These new experiences just emphasize to me the importance of accessibility. I think more understanding and a willingness to try would provide us all with more meaningful experiences and more fulfilled lives. I will do my best to continue to speak out in love whenever I can. I hope you, my readers, will do the same. Together, we can build a bridge of love which will improve the lives of all.

If you have comments about this topic, you may write a letter in braille or print to Renée Walker, 143 Williamson Dr, Macon, GA 31210; or you may email me at rkwalker@wynfieldca.org. You can also read and comment on my blog at http://www.deafblindhope.wordpress.com.

Read Full Post »


TOUCH POINTS

By Renée Walker

 

My last column brought a lot of attention from Good Cheer readers and my blog readers where I share this column as well. Feelings of isolation for DeafBlind individuals seem to be very common even if it is intermittent. We all seem to have felt it at some point. I was also pleasantly surprised that I had so many readers interested in my column. I know Good Cheer has a large audience, but it was very nice to learn that you are interested in what I have to say. I appreciate that very much. I will try to continue to discuss topics to which you can relate. Please continue to write me via email, print, or braille. I am very interested in your comments. I learn from you, and we can help each other discover hope for the future.

 

This month’s column is all about easing some of that isolation. There are options out there for DeafBlind individuals, but they are few, and none are perfect. I have discovered an option that I want to present to you. It may not work for you, but since it has helped me, I hoped that it might help a few of you. First, let me tell you that I am not employed by Apple, and I am not being compensated by Apple or American Publishing House for the Blind in any way. I wouldn’t even call myself an Apple supporter. I just look for ways to help myself continue to work and live as fully as I can. Often that is difficult because technology is so expensive, and I can’t get help from government agencies like some. I am glad there are some who can get the training and equipment they need from a government or non-profit organization. For me, that hasn’t been possible, so I have to look for ways to help myself.

 

Apple recently introduced an operating system called Snow Leopard that did what few other companies have ever done before. Apple built in accessibility options throughout their entire operating system making almost all tasks seamless and easy on their Macintosh line of computers. Their screen reader called Voice Over handles voice output and braille output very well. They have also built in options for the Deaf with closed captioning and visual notifications for many tasks such as emails. There is also Zoom for those with low vision. The greatest thing about these accessibility options is that it is included in every computer product sold without purchasing extra equipment and software for your needs. The most you need is a braille display if you require one. There are many braille displays that are compatible with Apple’s Voice Over with more being added all the time. The Voice Over commands are simple and similar to other popular screen readers. The learning curve isn’t as steep as others either with the built-in tutorial that really gets you started. You also don’t need a sighted person to help you configure your Apple computer because when you first boot it up, the system asks you if you need Zoom or vVoice Over. If you have a braille display connected to the computer, the voice is also displayed as text on your braille display. The system will then walk you through the entire configuration, and run the tutorial, if you desire. If  you are comfortable with computers at all, you can’t get it any better than that.

 

Some of you may not be comfortable with computers, or due to your severe losses of vision and hearing, you may be lucky if you have experience with notetakers. Computers may still be a bit more than you think can handle, or you might not be that interested in their many uses. Like many hearing/sighted people, email, text messages, and the occasional browsing of the internet to check shopping sites may be your only interests. If so, Apple has a few other options that can open your world in many ways without the hassles of learning how to use a computer. With the accessibility options built in, the effort can be more like a walk in the park. With the IPhone 4 or IPod Touch, you have fully accessible devices to browse the internet, send and receive SMS messages (text messages), send and receive email, take notes, write documents and read documents, have a face to face conversation with someone else even if they don’t know ASL or braille.  Again, the best part is that you don’t need to pay for extra software and equipment except for a braille display. It is all included in the device that is easily available to anyone regardless of disability issues. With the IPhone 4 or an IPod Touch, you need the help of someone sighted to go in the first time and turn on the screen reader. If you only need the zoom or screen magnification, you might be able to go into the settings and accessibility tabs to turn that on yourself. The sales clerk should be able to help you even if the person didn’t know about it before seeing you. My sales clerk heard me describe what I needed and said that must be in settings. He found it within about five seconds, and my braille display which was already on popped right up with where I was and instructions of how to get out or change accessibility options. I manipulated the buttons and joystick on my APH Refreshabraille 18 finding the web browser, the mail program, and other things as tears of joy streamed down my face. I have no experience really with JAWS, Window Eyes, or any other screen reader. I don’t know those kind of commands at all. With the IPhone 4, I didn’t need that knowledge at all. I just rotated through buttons and text finding what I wanted easily. I set up my email program by myself in the store and got my first email that I could read on my display. I had only just gotten the APH Refreshabraille 18, recently and had only read emails in braille on my MacBook a few times before. Here I was checking email on the first cell phone I have owned since losing my sight almost ten years before. My husband has had to set up my computers before and read everything to me, or I had to put my nose to the screen to read very large fonts. In recent years, I no longer have any residual sight and feeling as if I was disappearing from the world as my sight faded. Here I was setting up this device on my own and getting information. The sales clerk then typed a message to me just using the notes app that comes with the phone that I read on my display, “Hello, my name is Brian. Welcome back to the real world.” I spoke and said, “Hello, Brian. It is good to be back,” laughing and crying at the same time. I had just had my first conversation with another person who didn’t know ASL or through an interpreter in such a very long time. I can’t even describe the joy I felt at that moment.

 

Of course, the IPhone allows me to check and send email, browse the internet, and send text messages with a data plan and a text messaging plan. There are other useful apps available like the WhatsApp Messenger which allows the IPhone 4 or IPod Touch do text messages from smartphone to smartphone for free without needing a messaging plan. You just need a data plan on the IPhone 4 or access to the internet through a wireless connection on either the phone or the IPod Touch. This helps lessen your monthly fees if you can’t afford much. There is also a Color Identification app which is available in the Apple App Store for $.99 that tells you by voice and braille the color of any light source such as the color of your shirt or the color of the leaves on a tree. There are several multi-protocol chat programs, too. These allow you to log in to many of the common chat programs like AIM, Google Talk, IChat, and Yahoo! Messenger with one program app. Palringo is a free one that is totally accessible. There are probably others, as well. These and more powerful apps are being designed every day that can open our worlds to us regardless of how much sight and hearing we may have. The Apple IPad will also be totally accessible with a new update of the OS 4 beginning in November. It already has Voice Over and Zoom for the hearing blind and low vision or Hard of Hearing. In November, the software will be the same as the IPhone 4 and newest IPod Touch allowing braille displays and other features.

 

The world of the DeafBlind is changing quickly. Apple has proven that mainstream technology products can be made accessible with the same off the shelf products that hearing/sighted users enjoy without costing anymore to purchase. With companies like Apple deciding to reach out to those with disabilities they are increasing their market share for certain, but they are doing wonders by bringing the world back to those of us. Now I can explore that world with my IPhone 4’s GPS and maps. I will check back in with you next time. Well, if I don’t get too busy exploring…

 

 

If you have comments or questions about this article, you can email me at rkwalker@wynfieldca.org, or write me in braille or print at 143 Williamson Dr., Macon, GA 31210. Check my blog also at http://www.deafblindhope.wordpress.com. I am also on Facebook as Renée K. Walker, too, if you want to become friends.

 

Read Full Post »


Touch Points

By Renée Walker

How many of us have had problems getting what we need due to communication issues? Despite laws that are in place to help equalize education, entertainment, legal, and medical worlds, how many of us still have trouble accessing the world around us? In this rural area that I live, I have encountered enough problems to last me two lifetimes. Growing up hard of hearing as a child to deaf as a teen and young adult, I thought I knew plenty about the problems caused by the inability to fully communicate. When my vision problems became an issue that couldn’t be ignored or overlooked, I just didn’t realize what I was about to face. Coping with the loss of vision and eventually independence was hard enough. I just didn’t know that I would have a struggle just to see a doctor and be able to understand and act on my own behalf.

I think my first clue was that people didn’t know what a guide dog was at all. Stores, banks, schools, churches, and malls all refused to let me enter with my guide dog. It was a repeated effort of education with the help of my guide dog school, Southeastern Guide Dogs, Inc. that finally seemed to ease the travel issues over the first couple of years. As I learned to be more independent through travel and then after gaining more control from study at Helen Keller National Center, I found that I needed to face some serious health issues. I had been seeing doctors before for my chronic issues, but now things had changed. Needing a tactual interpreter to communicate my health problems with a physician became an absolute necessity. None of my preparation learning about communication cards, interpreting services, getting used to discussing private issues through a stranger helped me to cope with the shock that the medical agencies here didn’t seem to know anything about interpreters much less the American Disabilities Act. I tried to educate each doctor with a copy of the law and a list of interpreting agencies for the area which weren’t many and only a couple of interpreters from those agencies comfortable enough to agree to tactual interpreting. Every doctor’s office I had and new ones that I tried to go to for new or worsening symptoms or to replace doctors were now refusing to provide me with an interpreter. My procedure was to call and ask for an appointment. I didn’t have a problem getting an appointment, but after arranging a day and time, I would then state that I needed a tactual interpreter. Many times I had to explain what an interpreter did and then what a tactual interpreter did. I would explain how they went about finding one and requesting the service. I told them how they were responsible for the fees, but ADA law allowed them to take it off under operating expenses or overhead. I always offered to mail or fax the information to them and mentioned telephone numbers of agencies that they could call and ask questions. I also referred them to the website for the National Association for the Deaf (NAD). I would then say you can call me back, or I will call you back when you have had time to research your responsibilities under the law. I can’t remember a single one calling me back first. I would call them and ask again. This would usually go on for weeks before they would finally say, “We won’t provide an interpreter for you.” My initial contacts with NAD a year and a half ago resulted in nothing. They wouldn’t return my emails even though I knew the email address was correct. A few months ago, I tried again. I was pleased when someone did respond and was very helpful. They made phone calls to all the doctors’ office in question and were amazed how adamant most were in not caring if they were in violation of law. NAD sent letters from their attorney informing them of their responsibilities. One doctor’s office relented and now provides me an interpreter. The others still refused to do so. NAD felt the situation was bigger than they could handle and put me in touch with a group of attorneys at an advocacy center that is now in helping me with my problems. NAD continues to follow the situation. My current attorney has repeated the initial steps of phone calls and letters to try and solve the situation with the least amount of litigation as possible. The doctors’ offices in question have still refused to provide an interpreter for my appointments. The center is still acting on my behalf. I am still working to better educate the medical agencies in my area on the needs of deaf and deafblind patients regarding communication issues and their rights to be informed and make decisions. The fight goes on as my medical issues continue to deteriorate.

You might now ask if I contacted local and/or state agencies and private organizations for the deaf on this issue. I contacted them before I contacted NAD the first time. Most of my attempts to call were not returned. At one agency, I was told that in this area the deaf usually choose to use family members and friends who could sign or otherwise help them to communicate. The doctors’ offices in the area have come to expect this. This organization and others who mentioned similar reasoning felt that it was their responsibility to support what the Deaf community desired. I think back to when I could still see, and I went to the doctors without help. It wasn’t always easy because I had to keep asking the staff to look at me or repeat, but I didn’t know ASL. I had heard of ADA, but only knew about wheelchair ramps, braille signs, and hearing aid compatible phones. That was because I saw them around me in the environment and knew it was because of the ADA law. No one ever offered to explain that it meant more than that including the deaf services area of Vocational Rehabilitation Services that helped me get into college or later go to Helen Keller. Would I have requested accommodations if I had been informed? I don’t know, but it would have been nice to have had the choice to consider.

A final aspect to this situation that I would like to pose is the argument that the Deaf and some DeafBlind would rather use family members and friends. Of course, that is their choice, and I would not want to force anyone to do anything that would make one feel uncomfortable. Again, though, I would want to make sure that choice is an informed one. It has been shown that untrained family members or friends often do not understand the medical terminology and processes well enough to accurately translate to ASL or convey it most any other way. They often are too close to the patient and wish to shield them from pain and fear if the news is negative. Others may see the patient as more of a child and try to make the decisions for the patient. Or, often it is simply a matter of feeling overwhelmed with the information being given and trying to convey it to the patient that friend or family member resorts to, “I will tell you everything later”. If the patient is fully aware of these issues and is ok with that then fine, but education should be in place to make them aware of the possibilities and help the family members and friends be aware, too. Most of this would not be a conscious attempt to deceive just blinded my love and concern. In addition, the other side to this coin is the doctors’ offices are at risk as well. There have been cases of a patient making appointments and not requesting accommodations for communications such as for an interpreter and then suing the doctor’s office for not providing one. The patients win the case because the ADA law is clear. Having a policy of asking a deaf or deafblind patient if there are any communications issues and any modifications that they need and providing them upon that request could help protect them from such possible litigation. I have heard and read many opinions on all sides of this issue regarding providing interpreters in medical settings. The ADA law exists to protect deaf rights, and it was written to prevent overdue hardship on medical providers. Everyone needs to educate themselves and others. Litigation should not be needed for deaf and deafblind to receive proper medical care and understand that care given. The patient should not also have to fear that the medical provider might retaliate in poor care once forced to provide the accommodations for communication.

Advocacy is the key here with education and awareness being the preferred method. The law is there for us to use if needed. No one should have to have their medical issues ignored or medical decisions forced on them. We all need to work together on this and other issues that face us. Since there have been others asking about similar issues, I wanted to share my experiences in hopes of helping others.

If you have questions or comments, you may email me at rkwalker@wynfieldca.org or write me in braille at 143 Williamson Dr., Macon, GA 31210.

Read Full Post »


I am Associate Editor of Good Cheer, the international DeafBlind magazine. I write a column called Touch Points in each issue. Here I will post my columns after they are published in Good Cheer.

Touch Points

By Renée Walker

A Day at the Movies

 I had looked forward to this day for several months, since I had heard the opening day announcement. Even as old as I am, I love the stories about a young boy whose mother gave her life protecting his. I had read many of the books in print until my eyes finally gave out. I then began learning braille and finding these books printed in braille gave me the incentive to work hard. Going to see the movie based on the 6th book, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, was going to be difficult at best. I knew that I wouldn’t understand much with almost no hearing even with an FM system and a very small peripheral field and blurry acuity. I really wanted to try though because I had enjoyed the first couple of movies with my vision. We searched for a theater that provided closed captions or descriptive audio. I had never seen any of this technology and wasn’t quite sure how it worked, but I was hopeful. We finally found a theater that provided both of those technologies. The theater was almost a hundred miles away in South Atlanta and called AMC Southlake Pavilion. My wonderful husband agreed to take off work to take me. We didn’t understand how to figure out what movie was currently shown using the technology or times or anything actually, so we just picked a day and drove up there early in the morning expecting to have to get tickets for a particular showing and go shopping until time. For me, it was worth it.

The day finally arrived. We loaded up Joey and ourselves and drove the miles to the theater. We arrived to find that the Harry Potter movie was not available with the technology at that time. I was disappointed, but I kept my chin up. My husband talked with the manager, Janine, who carefully explained to him the workings of the web site and the technology in general, so we could plan better next time. Since Harry Potter would not be scheduled for the accessible theater, we decided to come back later that morning and see it anyway. I wasn’t interested in the movie playing in the accessible theater. I don’t know what all my husband talked about with Janine, since I couldn’t understand anything and Scott doesn’t know sign except for trying to learning Fingerspelling. Later, he said that he had just mentioned how I missed the movies. Janine got on the phone and talked to someone for a few minutes finally saying, tell someone to swap out the current movie in the accessible theater for Harry Potter. Scott turned to me and explained the gist of what was happening. My heart nearly jumped out of my chest with excitement. I tried hard to fight the tears welling up in my eyes, but the tears betrayed my emotions as a tear rolled down my cheeks. Scott and Janine looked at me. Scott asked if I was ok. I said happy is all. Scott told Janine how so much has been a fight since I lost my sight as well as being deaf. Everything from taking my guide dog into restaurants to seeing doctors with interpreters to getting accessible technology to help me work and communicate has been a battle. It was a wonderful feeling to have someone be so nice to me. I thanked Janine, and she touched my shoulder gently. It was easy to tell without sight and sound that she was saying she was so glad to help me. Joey went straight to her and wagged his tail. Janine leaned down, and he slurped his tongue across her face. He doesn’t do that while working usually. Scott was quickly apologizing, but Janine said she loved it, and she rubbed Joey’s ears.

A short time later, we were sitting in our movie chairs with popcorn loaded with butter and cokes sitting in the arms’ cup holders. I had one cup holder filled with a flexible stand with a tinted but see through piece of plastic attached extending in front of my face. I also had the descriptive audio headphones. As the movie started, it took a few moments to adjust the plastic just right for me to see the captions with my field of vision and to get the headset adjusted. It took a few more to figure a way to shift from the screen to the captions to keep up with the action. I finally decided to turn on my FM because the headset wasn’t helping at all. My FM had never worked to pick up anything in my area theaters, but I figured it wouldn’t hurt to try since I was some place new. I touched the buttons to turn the FM on and press the correct order to change the frequency when suddenly noise. I actually jumped. I couldn’t quite understand words, but I kept concentrating until a few words began to come through the crackles. It was obviously the description of what was going on the screen.  I relaxed and focused my eyes on the plastic screen and scanned until I found the captions. By concentrating on the noise in my head and the fuzzy letters forming in front of me, I actually began to get the story. Of course, it helped to have read the story before. I was totally amazed. I was actually enjoying a movie for the first time in ten years thanks to some wonderful technology.

As we left the theater, I was walking on air happier than I have been in a while. Janine met us out front and asked how I enjoyed the movie, but said is your face evidence of your enjoyment? Scott translated, and I nearly jumped up and down signing and speaking, “Yes! Yes!” I thanked her again, and she said, “No problem. You and Joey have just made my day! It is so good that the equipment really helps to bring a little fun to people.” We left, and I thanked God for my blessings. It is nice to know that this journey with DeafBlindness won’t always be full of battles.

Read Full Post »


Many people have asked how can they help WCA’s DeafBlind Hope program when the economy is just too tough for them to donate money. Well, there are many ways, but a few come instantly to mind. You can search the internet for us, shop online for us, or clip coupons for us. You simply do what you do every day, but you can do it to help DeafBlind Hope.

Instead of Googling, as it has begun to be called, you can search using YaHoo!’s GoodSearch engine. You search the internet, and GoodSearch donates to DeafBlind Hope. Go to GoodSearch.com, and choose Wynfield Christian Academy as your charity. Then search away. WCA’s DeafBlind Hope gets funds for every search you to do. You can also download a toolbar for GoodSearch for Firefox or Internet Explorer to make your searching more convenient. Get your knowledge on by searching the internet for WCA’s DeafBlind Hope.

If you like to shop online, you can find many of your favorite stores on GoodShop.com. If you shop in your favorite store through GoodShop, the store will donate a percentage of your purchase to Wynfield Christian Academy. Just go to Goodshop.com and click on your favorite store. You are then sent to your store’s website, but with a code attached to your entry that notifies the store that you are shopping for WCA. Shopping online is easier and often cheaper than in a brick and mortar store. Now do your shopping online, and help a DeafBlind Hope client live more independently.

If you don’t search the internet much or shop online, you can also help by just going to the grocery store. We all have to go to the grocery store some time. WCA is enrolled in two programs from companies such as Campbell’s and Pillsbury where they will donate to WCA if you buy their products. You simply clip and save coupons from these products. After you have saved a few coupons, mail them to WCA. We sort them and redeem them for cash and merchandise. The two programs are Labels for Education sponsored by Campbell’s companies and Box tops 4 Education sponsored by Pillsbury and General Mills companies. You can find out more from their web sites: Labels for Education and Box Tops 4 Education. I understand that many of you, like me, are budget conscious and buy generic. However, check out the brand names for the products you buy and see if any participate in these two programs. If so, just consider if you can afford the extra cents for a good cause.

DeafBlind Hope is definitely a worthy cause. I invest my life in it, so I know. The DeafBlind are the least helped population whose expenses far outweigh many disabled’s expenses. You can do a lot to help a DeafBlind person get the training and equipment they need to be independent and productive. WCA’s DeafBlind Hope program strives to keep zero administrative costs to allow all donations to go to the clients who need them. You or your organization can help in many ways. Many have held unique fundraisers for our purposes such as t-shirt sales, craft festivals, music festivals, etc. You can find out more at DeafBlind Hope. Whether you search the internet, shop, clip and save, or whatever other ideas you can think up, you will be helping some truly wonderful people. Regardless to how you help, you can also pray for our mission, and spread the word about DeafBlind Hope.

Links for Eligible Products
Labels for Education

Boxtops 4 Education

Mail coupons to:
Wynfield Christian Academy
143 Williamson Dr.
Macon, GA 31210

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: