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Posts Tagged ‘Wynfield Christian Academy’


Just how are we supposed to answer such big questions from children when they are big questions with no visible, concrete answers even for us? That is especially difficult when you know a lot rides on that answer. One such question is about the existence of God? How do we know God is Really There? is a book by Melissa Cain Travis and illustrated by Christopher Voss and published by Apologia that might get you started with your little ones and maybe, even firm the debate dialogue in your own mind.

Book cover pic of a father and child reading a the book together.

The story is a simple plot that plays out in many bedrooms, kitchens, backyards, and yes, treehouses over and over. A mother and child or a father and child playing and learning together when a child suddenly asks that question that makes our mind jerk to a halt and releases the feelings of inadequacy and even a little fear as the questions of our own spill into our mind. What? How did we get here now? How can I possibly explain this to him when I can’t always put words to this myself? How do I tell her that I just know God exists because I see Him everywhere when He is invisible? Using wonderful illustrations that look drawn by a child and almost real enough to touch the crayon wax and words that fill your mind with awe and lead you through a rational discovery through the known ideas of science to the abstract thinking in a step by step path to the only conclusion that makes sense of a person who chose to create the world and has the power to do it. You end with a pretty powerful answer to that all-important question: How Do We Know God is Really There?

Father and son looking at Saturn through a telescope as they explore God's creation.

The  book’s scientific content does seem a bit weighty for very young children, but it can be a good read-to-me book for five to eight year olds and a good read together book for up to about ten or eleven with some children. The concept though can be used in conversations beyond that age level. Many young children and some special needs children may not get all the deep content the first time, but they will get the gist that can be grown through repeated readings as they grow older. The analogy to to rewinding a video is a humorous way of toning down that weighty science material. if it isn’t enough, the idea might lead you to something even better that your child will understand, so don’t fear giving this book a chance.

Father and son discussing how they can know God is really there by exploring his creation and knowing it was created by a loving, all powerful Creator, God.

You can find this book on Apologia’s web site to get more information or to order. The price is $16.00 for a durable, glossy, full-color hardback copy. That is affordable, but is it worth it? Three parents that I asked to read the book felt it was a great way to handle this tough question. Two students I read it to, including one in ASL, got really big-eyed and curious and really loved the pictures. The book got even the four year old who happened to be listening, too, talking about how “God is so big and can do anything.” That delight was enough for me to make it a part of our library permanently.

I have received a copy of the above product to help facilitate a frank and honest review. A positive review is not guaranteed. All opinions are my own. Your results and opinions may vary.

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This month at Homeschool Mosaics I begin a three-part series on Cochlear Implants. I try to tell you the Good, the Bad, and the ugly of it all. I worked hard researching all the facts again to allow everyone to make their own choice. It doesn’t matter if you are Deaf, deaf, hard of hearing, DeafBlind, hearing and sighted. The more you know about things the better we can support one another when it comes to this controversial topic. Check it out! http://homeschoolmosaics.com/cochlear-implants-the-good-the-bad/

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It is my day on Homeschool Mosaics again. In fact, with all the reviews I have been working on lately, I missed posting here about my column last month, so check this one out about what is happening in the world of ASL interpreting. http://homeschoolmosaics.com/advances-in-asl-interpreting-good-or-bad/

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discovery-kitMany students struggle with learning to read. Many also learn to read despite poor teaching as more and more schools leave out phonics and reading fundamentals. Students who do well regardless of teaching seem to pick up on these basics naturally. They may not understand what they are doing completely, but the students sense these elements and use them to recognize words and meanings. Other students with and without learning difficulties may not fully sense these factors, and it hinders their reading development. What is needed is a a program that teaches reading basics well and in a multi-sensory method allowing it to be more beneficial for all types of students. One such program was sent to me a few months ago to review. I have been using it with several students since then with great success. One student is a five year old beginning reader. This student is fairly average in all ways except amazing cuteness. Another is a high schooler with learning disabilities including dyslexia who continues to struggle with reading. One is blind and hard of hearing and is nine. Two others are six and seven and have some mild learning issues. The program is Reading Horizons: Discovery. There is an online version. I won’t be reviewing it due to accessibility issues because I am DeafBlind. The website listed below has a page that lists reviews for their products from independent bloggers like myself. You can check out the other reviews for this program and the online program, too.

The introduction to Reading Horizons Discovery states, “Reading Horizons Discovery is an explicit, systematic, research-based phonics program based on the Reading Horizons method. Multi-sensory techniques are employed via direct instruction and the use of interactive computer software programs. The manuals and computer software are correlated to support each other, but each can be used independently of the other for instructional purposes. All students can benefit from using the explicit, sequential, direct instruction the Reading Horizons method has to offer.” The program is ideally suited for students with learning disabilities including those with dyslexia, but it is also very beneficial to all students because of its multi-sensory techniques and methods that integrates not only phonics, but also basic language arts skills. In addition, vocabulary development and spelling are integral parts of the program.

Providing posters, worksheets, software, online support, Reading Horizons’ method, in a nutshell attempt, involves using hand directions to dictate a letter, sound, or word, use hand directions to receive that letter, sound, or word repeated by the student. The letters, sounds, or words are dictated twice and the students repeat twice. The students will then write the letter, sound, or word once. These aspects helped the student to learn to focus and prepare to listen carefully. Another aspect of the method, is the markings and slide which are taught early on and used throughout the program. The program teaches 42 sounds of the alphabet. The vowel “a” is taught first. The consonant “b” is next. The slide is then introduced to teach, emphasize, and remind students to slide from the consonant to the vowel sound smoothly developing fluid pronunciation from the beginning. In word decoding as the students progress, students learn to mark the vowel first. Then slide through pronunciation of the consonant and vowels before adding the ending sound. The program teaches not only phonics, but also phonological awareness besides just phonemes, all of which is imperative for developing good reading skills for all students including dyslexics. The well-designed program of Reading Horizons ensures that these skills are not only learned, but mastered. The thorough teacher’s manual including complete, scripted lesson plans helps the busy teacher with lots of Reading experience and the less experienced teacher in the classroom or home.

Reading Horizons Discovery program is suitable for many types of students because it is multi-sensory and that phonics and phonological awareness are emphasized. What about other Special Needs besides Learning Disabled or developmentally delayed, for example? In my case, that question would be, “is it Deaf, Blind, and DeafBlind suitable?” Obviously, there are some that the program or any program based on auditory alone or visual alone would not work. With modifications, it could work for those who are hard of hearing, hearing blind, low vision, and DeafBlind who have some residual sight and hearing. As always, if you wish to try this program with these populations, you must focus on modifying the material and the methods emphasizing the primary mode of communication. Use ASL or a visual communication mode to go along with the hand motions of the program to ensure that the student understands the letters and words being taught. For low vision students, use larger print. For braille users after tactile readiness has been developed, you might think that there is no point, but many braille courses for young learners puts little focus on phonics or phonological awareness. Braille is still reading, but recognizing letters and words by feel, so the need for phonics and phonological awareness is still there and should be emphasized more to improve reading skills. Also, homeschoolers, who are an audience of my blog, often find that braille curriculum is too expensive for them and their blind students to use. Therefore, it is often necessary to modify regular programs for braille learners. Using the auditory cues of dictate and repeat either with or without tactile hand motions (DeafBlind, especially need), the student will still be taught to focus and prepare to listen carefully. Marking can be done verbally to note aspects such as finding and identifying the vowel sound first as can “slide” where the vocal or tactile motions are the reminder for the steps to help the students decode the words they feeling with their fingers. For those with less sight and hearing, we were using these signals both verbally and with hand motions that the student could feel with their hands as we spoke the reminders. At first, you would think this must be frivolous additions, but we have been finding these techniques are useful for helping students decode regardless of their learning issue. It was an easy task, too, understanding what the markings and motions were intended for to modify the techniques as needed while working with our students who have varying degrees of hearing and vision loss. For those who use less speech, their comprehension was occasionally gauged more on their signs and fingerspelling, though most had some ability to speak and/or receiving speech therapy time. Even the braille learner used the techniques while reading with fingers. We did the steps after the student read the individual letters first and indicated what the letter was. Then used the steps to indicate what the sounds were followed by using a motion of the hand forward to indicate the slide (the word “slide” was also spoken)  as the slide of the sounds (ex. fa) was then pronounced verbally. As with anything, some of our initial modifications were cumbersome or ineffective, but we recognized that the system can be useful if we are thoughtful of the purposes of the techniques and adjust as needed. The best educational research always goes on in the grassroots of  the individual classroom.

This has been a description of Reading Horizons Discovery in a nutshell. There is no way to cover it well here or cover the many types of students and how the program can be modified to help these special populations. I also know that there is no one program, text-based or software, that is suitable for all students. I can say that Reading Horizons Discovery does work for those I am working with and can for many others. As in my own case, I always have to be creative when using some product, but it is often worth the effort. Reading Horizons Discovery was worth the effort for me and several of my students.

Pricing information for the Discovery at Home reading set is as follows:

Discovery Product      Pricing 

Discovery Online Software     $  199.00

Discovery Instructor Materials     $  299.00

Discovery Software and Instructor Material Bundle     $  439.00

Discovery Little Books Grades 1-3     $  159.00

Discovery Little Books Kindergarten     $    29.99

To learn more about Reading Horizons Discovery program, go to http://www.readinghorizons.com.

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Check out Homeschool Mosaics today, and better yet, follow the site, so you always know when the great articles are posted including mine. Today, I tell you a little about how I am able to be Principal of an accredited private school that serves homeschoolers. You don’t want to miss it! My Life as a DeafBlind Teacher should give you some insight into what I do, how I do it, and most importantly who deserves the credit. I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it because I got to show my appreciation to some truly special people. Check it out!

Make sure you come back here soon, too, because now that school has started back I have some posts coming on a couple of curriculums that I have been looking to use, and I have a few on some my musings about certain educational topics like labels. You might get a slightly different perspective on some things when I am finished, so come back soon to read these new posts.

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I was watching a popular Bible teacher this morning, Joyce Meyer. I enjoy her. I feel she is anointed by God even if I may not agree with everything she teaches or believes. Today, she was talking about not having to be perfect and not having to be constantly worried about whether we are doing right or wrong. God loves us even though we are imperfect. He is pleased with us despite of our imperfectness because we want to do right. We are trying to do right. He also uses us despite the fact that we aren’t perfect. She told a story about when she thought she was hearing from God to be a preacher or Bible Teacher. She wasn’t sure if that was really from God. Many of us struggle with knowing if we are hearing from God. Often times, we have acted on something and made a fool of ourselves because it wasn’t from God, so we become afraid to try to listen and act on God’s will for us. Joyce went on to say that she took a tiny step in faith to test it. She started teaching a Bible study in her home. God blessed it. People came. It grew, so she knew that her desire had been God speaking to her. That was interesting to me. I have learned to do the same thing in my life as I try to follow where God is leading me.

What interested me more, though, was what she said next. Joyce Meyer said she taught that class in short shorts and smoking cigarettes. She smoked so many cigarettes, she said, that smoke filled the room where she and her guests couldn’t see each other. I thought to myself that I know some people who would have tried to shut her down if it was a church sponsored or advertised event or at the very least they would have stopped going and told everyone they knew about that woman who was disrespecting God by reading scriptures while dressed so inappropriately and smoking like a “choo choo”. I know in my own life that I have had people criticize me and tell me to stop doing something that I felt God was leading me to do because I wasn’t perfect. I had sin in my life. I sometimes sinned while I was doing what God wanted me to do. I wasn’t necessarily meaning to sin. I just did. I sometimes have a temper. I sometimes get passionate about something or angry and use certain colorful expressions or even profanity. I was trying to do right. I often failed, but I was trying. I wanted to be good at what I was doing for my Lord, though, so I kept trying. Doing it in the face of harsh criticism was very difficult at times, but I kept trying.

It is obvious though that God wasn’t disrespected. He wasn’t offended or angered. God was pleased with Joyce Meyer. She was doing what He wanted her to do which was teach His word to others. God was pleased with her even though she wasn’t doing it in perfectly the right way. He blessed her efforts and brought her more students and increased her borders of influence. God is still doing that today. God anointed her though she was imperfect because she wanted to do His will. That was enough. Along the way, God helped her to learn how to do His work in better ways. Eventually, He used her husband to point out that she really should dress more appropriately. Eventually, God showed her that she should stop abusing His temple, her body, by smoking and helped her to stop.

In the same way, God was pleased with me. My teaching improved. He sent me to various places to teach that were difficult in many ways, but honed my skills even more. God showed me patterns in some of the students I taught that were more of a challenge and helped me to develop better ways to teach them. When I was better prepared, God gave me the desire and life situations to confirm the desire was from Him to prompt me to begin teaching first just a few students out of my home to now a growing, accredited school that helps all kinds of students including some with needs that other schools haven’t been able to reach. God is helping us to reach those students’ needs successfully. He is even now using my more recent situation of being Deaf and blind to help me to understand even more the needs of people like myself and giving me the desire and resources to begin helping others like myself become more independent. Along the way, he has helped me with my temper to learn more how to control it when it isn’t appropriate, but given me the courage to use it to help fight what is wrong. I am still not perfect in so many ways, but God is pleased with me, and He is anointing me to do the work He has for me.

The criticism is often still there from those I don’t know to even those very close to me. It can still be difficult at times, but I have learned that it is more often the work of Satan in those voices and in the voices in my own mind trying to lessen my impact and weaken my spirit. I have to focus on the lessons I have learned.

From that knowledge that God is pleased with me and blessing my efforts of doing His will for me, I am learning a new lesson that I also see Paul teaching in 1 Corinthians 4:3-5.

3But [as for me personally] it matters very little to me that I should be put on trial by you [on this point], and that you or any other human tribunal should investigate and question and cross-question me. I do not even put myself on trial and judge myself.  4I am not conscious of anything against myself, and I feel blameless; but I am not vindicated and acquitted before God on that account. It is the Lord [Himself] Who examines and judges me. 5So do not make any hasty or premature judgments before the time when the Lord comes [again], for He will both bring to light the secret things that are [now hidden] in darkness and disclose and expose the [secret] aims (motives and purposes) of hearts. Then every man will receive his [due] commendation from God. Amplified Bible (AMP)

I am learning to let go of the worry about my mistakes and the fear that I will displeased God with my mistakes. That is true freedom found in knowing Christ as Savior and Lord. God is pleased with me in spite of my mistakes. He already knows my flaws and what mistakes I will make. He knows we aren’t perfect. He knows what we are going to do wrong before we even do it. He also sent His Son, Jesus, to live like us. Jesus understands what we go through. He didn’t sin, and He can help us to learn how to live right. We find these promises in Jeremiah 1:4-5 and Hebrews 4:14-16. He is pleased with me simply because I have chosen to love His Son and chosen to try to do what is right with the help of Jesus. I can be free because I am confident that God loves me and is pleased with me. I can be free because I am confident that because I am trying to follow that God will lead me in His way and bless my efforts.

This freedom can be found by everyone. It is found by choosing Christ and wanting to do right and allowing Christ to help us learn while we are also being used to reach others in spite of our imperfections. Part of that means we also have to learn that we can be blessed by others who are imperfect, but anointed, too.

 

 

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Touch Points

By Renée Walker

How many of us have had problems getting what we need due to communication issues? Despite laws that are in place to help equalize education, entertainment, legal, and medical worlds, how many of us still have trouble accessing the world around us? In this rural area that I live, I have encountered enough problems to last me two lifetimes. Growing up hard of hearing as a child to deaf as a teen and young adult, I thought I knew plenty about the problems caused by the inability to fully communicate. When my vision problems became an issue that couldn’t be ignored or overlooked, I just didn’t realize what I was about to face. Coping with the loss of vision and eventually independence was hard enough. I just didn’t know that I would have a struggle just to see a doctor and be able to understand and act on my own behalf.

I think my first clue was that people didn’t know what a guide dog was at all. Stores, banks, schools, churches, and malls all refused to let me enter with my guide dog. It was a repeated effort of education with the help of my guide dog school, Southeastern Guide Dogs, Inc. that finally seemed to ease the travel issues over the first couple of years. As I learned to be more independent through travel and then after gaining more control from study at Helen Keller National Center, I found that I needed to face some serious health issues. I had been seeing doctors before for my chronic issues, but now things had changed. Needing a tactual interpreter to communicate my health problems with a physician became an absolute necessity. None of my preparation learning about communication cards, interpreting services, getting used to discussing private issues through a stranger helped me to cope with the shock that the medical agencies here didn’t seem to know anything about interpreters much less the American Disabilities Act. I tried to educate each doctor with a copy of the law and a list of interpreting agencies for the area which weren’t many and only a couple of interpreters from those agencies comfortable enough to agree to tactual interpreting. Every doctor’s office I had and new ones that I tried to go to for new or worsening symptoms or to replace doctors were now refusing to provide me with an interpreter. My procedure was to call and ask for an appointment. I didn’t have a problem getting an appointment, but after arranging a day and time, I would then state that I needed a tactual interpreter. Many times I had to explain what an interpreter did and then what a tactual interpreter did. I would explain how they went about finding one and requesting the service. I told them how they were responsible for the fees, but ADA law allowed them to take it off under operating expenses or overhead. I always offered to mail or fax the information to them and mentioned telephone numbers of agencies that they could call and ask questions. I also referred them to the website for the National Association for the Deaf (NAD). I would then say you can call me back, or I will call you back when you have had time to research your responsibilities under the law. I can’t remember a single one calling me back first. I would call them and ask again. This would usually go on for weeks before they would finally say, “We won’t provide an interpreter for you.” My initial contacts with NAD a year and a half ago resulted in nothing. They wouldn’t return my emails even though I knew the email address was correct. A few months ago, I tried again. I was pleased when someone did respond and was very helpful. They made phone calls to all the doctors’ office in question and were amazed how adamant most were in not caring if they were in violation of law. NAD sent letters from their attorney informing them of their responsibilities. One doctor’s office relented and now provides me an interpreter. The others still refused to do so. NAD felt the situation was bigger than they could handle and put me in touch with a group of attorneys at an advocacy center that is now in helping me with my problems. NAD continues to follow the situation. My current attorney has repeated the initial steps of phone calls and letters to try and solve the situation with the least amount of litigation as possible. The doctors’ offices in question have still refused to provide an interpreter for my appointments. The center is still acting on my behalf. I am still working to better educate the medical agencies in my area on the needs of deaf and deafblind patients regarding communication issues and their rights to be informed and make decisions. The fight goes on as my medical issues continue to deteriorate.

You might now ask if I contacted local and/or state agencies and private organizations for the deaf on this issue. I contacted them before I contacted NAD the first time. Most of my attempts to call were not returned. At one agency, I was told that in this area the deaf usually choose to use family members and friends who could sign or otherwise help them to communicate. The doctors’ offices in the area have come to expect this. This organization and others who mentioned similar reasoning felt that it was their responsibility to support what the Deaf community desired. I think back to when I could still see, and I went to the doctors without help. It wasn’t always easy because I had to keep asking the staff to look at me or repeat, but I didn’t know ASL. I had heard of ADA, but only knew about wheelchair ramps, braille signs, and hearing aid compatible phones. That was because I saw them around me in the environment and knew it was because of the ADA law. No one ever offered to explain that it meant more than that including the deaf services area of Vocational Rehabilitation Services that helped me get into college or later go to Helen Keller. Would I have requested accommodations if I had been informed? I don’t know, but it would have been nice to have had the choice to consider.

A final aspect to this situation that I would like to pose is the argument that the Deaf and some DeafBlind would rather use family members and friends. Of course, that is their choice, and I would not want to force anyone to do anything that would make one feel uncomfortable. Again, though, I would want to make sure that choice is an informed one. It has been shown that untrained family members or friends often do not understand the medical terminology and processes well enough to accurately translate to ASL or convey it most any other way. They often are too close to the patient and wish to shield them from pain and fear if the news is negative. Others may see the patient as more of a child and try to make the decisions for the patient. Or, often it is simply a matter of feeling overwhelmed with the information being given and trying to convey it to the patient that friend or family member resorts to, “I will tell you everything later”. If the patient is fully aware of these issues and is ok with that then fine, but education should be in place to make them aware of the possibilities and help the family members and friends be aware, too. Most of this would not be a conscious attempt to deceive just blinded my love and concern. In addition, the other side to this coin is the doctors’ offices are at risk as well. There have been cases of a patient making appointments and not requesting accommodations for communications such as for an interpreter and then suing the doctor’s office for not providing one. The patients win the case because the ADA law is clear. Having a policy of asking a deaf or deafblind patient if there are any communications issues and any modifications that they need and providing them upon that request could help protect them from such possible litigation. I have heard and read many opinions on all sides of this issue regarding providing interpreters in medical settings. The ADA law exists to protect deaf rights, and it was written to prevent overdue hardship on medical providers. Everyone needs to educate themselves and others. Litigation should not be needed for deaf and deafblind to receive proper medical care and understand that care given. The patient should not also have to fear that the medical provider might retaliate in poor care once forced to provide the accommodations for communication.

Advocacy is the key here with education and awareness being the preferred method. The law is there for us to use if needed. No one should have to have their medical issues ignored or medical decisions forced on them. We all need to work together on this and other issues that face us. Since there have been others asking about similar issues, I wanted to share my experiences in hopes of helping others.

If you have questions or comments, you may email me at rkwalker@wynfieldca.org or write me in braille at 143 Williamson Dr., Macon, GA 31210.

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I am Associate Editor of Good Cheer, the international DeafBlind magazine. I write a column called Touch Points in each issue. Here I will post my columns after they are published in Good Cheer.

Touch Points

By Renée Walker

A Day at the Movies

 I had looked forward to this day for several months, since I had heard the opening day announcement. Even as old as I am, I love the stories about a young boy whose mother gave her life protecting his. I had read many of the books in print until my eyes finally gave out. I then began learning braille and finding these books printed in braille gave me the incentive to work hard. Going to see the movie based on the 6th book, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, was going to be difficult at best. I knew that I wouldn’t understand much with almost no hearing even with an FM system and a very small peripheral field and blurry acuity. I really wanted to try though because I had enjoyed the first couple of movies with my vision. We searched for a theater that provided closed captions or descriptive audio. I had never seen any of this technology and wasn’t quite sure how it worked, but I was hopeful. We finally found a theater that provided both of those technologies. The theater was almost a hundred miles away in South Atlanta and called AMC Southlake Pavilion. My wonderful husband agreed to take off work to take me. We didn’t understand how to figure out what movie was currently shown using the technology or times or anything actually, so we just picked a day and drove up there early in the morning expecting to have to get tickets for a particular showing and go shopping until time. For me, it was worth it.

The day finally arrived. We loaded up Joey and ourselves and drove the miles to the theater. We arrived to find that the Harry Potter movie was not available with the technology at that time. I was disappointed, but I kept my chin up. My husband talked with the manager, Janine, who carefully explained to him the workings of the web site and the technology in general, so we could plan better next time. Since Harry Potter would not be scheduled for the accessible theater, we decided to come back later that morning and see it anyway. I wasn’t interested in the movie playing in the accessible theater. I don’t know what all my husband talked about with Janine, since I couldn’t understand anything and Scott doesn’t know sign except for trying to learning Fingerspelling. Later, he said that he had just mentioned how I missed the movies. Janine got on the phone and talked to someone for a few minutes finally saying, tell someone to swap out the current movie in the accessible theater for Harry Potter. Scott turned to me and explained the gist of what was happening. My heart nearly jumped out of my chest with excitement. I tried hard to fight the tears welling up in my eyes, but the tears betrayed my emotions as a tear rolled down my cheeks. Scott and Janine looked at me. Scott asked if I was ok. I said happy is all. Scott told Janine how so much has been a fight since I lost my sight as well as being deaf. Everything from taking my guide dog into restaurants to seeing doctors with interpreters to getting accessible technology to help me work and communicate has been a battle. It was a wonderful feeling to have someone be so nice to me. I thanked Janine, and she touched my shoulder gently. It was easy to tell without sight and sound that she was saying she was so glad to help me. Joey went straight to her and wagged his tail. Janine leaned down, and he slurped his tongue across her face. He doesn’t do that while working usually. Scott was quickly apologizing, but Janine said she loved it, and she rubbed Joey’s ears.

A short time later, we were sitting in our movie chairs with popcorn loaded with butter and cokes sitting in the arms’ cup holders. I had one cup holder filled with a flexible stand with a tinted but see through piece of plastic attached extending in front of my face. I also had the descriptive audio headphones. As the movie started, it took a few moments to adjust the plastic just right for me to see the captions with my field of vision and to get the headset adjusted. It took a few more to figure a way to shift from the screen to the captions to keep up with the action. I finally decided to turn on my FM because the headset wasn’t helping at all. My FM had never worked to pick up anything in my area theaters, but I figured it wouldn’t hurt to try since I was some place new. I touched the buttons to turn the FM on and press the correct order to change the frequency when suddenly noise. I actually jumped. I couldn’t quite understand words, but I kept concentrating until a few words began to come through the crackles. It was obviously the description of what was going on the screen.  I relaxed and focused my eyes on the plastic screen and scanned until I found the captions. By concentrating on the noise in my head and the fuzzy letters forming in front of me, I actually began to get the story. Of course, it helped to have read the story before. I was totally amazed. I was actually enjoying a movie for the first time in ten years thanks to some wonderful technology.

As we left the theater, I was walking on air happier than I have been in a while. Janine met us out front and asked how I enjoyed the movie, but said is your face evidence of your enjoyment? Scott translated, and I nearly jumped up and down signing and speaking, “Yes! Yes!” I thanked her again, and she said, “No problem. You and Joey have just made my day! It is so good that the equipment really helps to bring a little fun to people.” We left, and I thanked God for my blessings. It is nice to know that this journey with DeafBlindness won’t always be full of battles.

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Many people have asked how can they help WCA’s DeafBlind Hope program when the economy is just too tough for them to donate money. Well, there are many ways, but a few come instantly to mind. You can search the internet for us, shop online for us, or clip coupons for us. You simply do what you do every day, but you can do it to help DeafBlind Hope.

Instead of Googling, as it has begun to be called, you can search using YaHoo!’s GoodSearch engine. You search the internet, and GoodSearch donates to DeafBlind Hope. Go to GoodSearch.com, and choose Wynfield Christian Academy as your charity. Then search away. WCA’s DeafBlind Hope gets funds for every search you to do. You can also download a toolbar for GoodSearch for Firefox or Internet Explorer to make your searching more convenient. Get your knowledge on by searching the internet for WCA’s DeafBlind Hope.

If you like to shop online, you can find many of your favorite stores on GoodShop.com. If you shop in your favorite store through GoodShop, the store will donate a percentage of your purchase to Wynfield Christian Academy. Just go to Goodshop.com and click on your favorite store. You are then sent to your store’s website, but with a code attached to your entry that notifies the store that you are shopping for WCA. Shopping online is easier and often cheaper than in a brick and mortar store. Now do your shopping online, and help a DeafBlind Hope client live more independently.

If you don’t search the internet much or shop online, you can also help by just going to the grocery store. We all have to go to the grocery store some time. WCA is enrolled in two programs from companies such as Campbell’s and Pillsbury where they will donate to WCA if you buy their products. You simply clip and save coupons from these products. After you have saved a few coupons, mail them to WCA. We sort them and redeem them for cash and merchandise. The two programs are Labels for Education sponsored by Campbell’s companies and Box tops 4 Education sponsored by Pillsbury and General Mills companies. You can find out more from their web sites: Labels for Education and Box Tops 4 Education. I understand that many of you, like me, are budget conscious and buy generic. However, check out the brand names for the products you buy and see if any participate in these two programs. If so, just consider if you can afford the extra cents for a good cause.

DeafBlind Hope is definitely a worthy cause. I invest my life in it, so I know. The DeafBlind are the least helped population whose expenses far outweigh many disabled’s expenses. You can do a lot to help a DeafBlind person get the training and equipment they need to be independent and productive. WCA’s DeafBlind Hope program strives to keep zero administrative costs to allow all donations to go to the clients who need them. You or your organization can help in many ways. Many have held unique fundraisers for our purposes such as t-shirt sales, craft festivals, music festivals, etc. You can find out more at DeafBlind Hope. Whether you search the internet, shop, clip and save, or whatever other ideas you can think up, you will be helping some truly wonderful people. Regardless to how you help, you can also pray for our mission, and spread the word about DeafBlind Hope.

Links for Eligible Products
Labels for Education

Boxtops 4 Education

Mail coupons to:
Wynfield Christian Academy
143 Williamson Dr.
Macon, GA 31210

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