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Posts Tagged ‘American Sign Language’


Week 2: Out of the Evaluation Phase

Well, they have moved me out of the usual 8 week evaluation period and straight into the training phase. Hopefully, that will mean that I will get to come home a little sooner. We shall see. I still have got to get this old brain to learn a lot of new skills. This week involved me transcribing more Braille and using the Perkins Brailler, which is like an old manual typewriter, but it only has 6 keys and a spacebar. The 6 keys each stand for one dot in the Braille cell. Depending on which keys I hit, I form different patterns of dots to form letters or punctuation. For example, there are 2 vertical rows of 3 dots in a Braille cell. 1 dot in the top left is letter a. If I want to capitalize that a, I use two Braille cells beside each other with the first having a dot in the lower right, 6, spot meaning the next letter is a capital. Then I would follow it with a dot in the upper right, 1, spot. The dots are numbered like this:
1 4
2 5
3 6
Here is the Braille alphabet, so you can get an idea of what I am learning:
Braille Alphabet:

Braille Pictures, Images and Photos

Words and sentences are made by combinations of those cells. However to write these letters so the dot show up on the top side of a page to be read, you have to type them backwards. Now that is a feat. If you are interested in learning more about Braille and Louis Braille, who invented the language, check out the American Federation for the Blind’s site, http://www.afb.org/braillebug/braille_print.asp.
I am continuing to cook blindfolded in the Independent Learning class. I cooked rice in a rice cooker that was quite simple, but try it blindfolded without burning yourself. I have to find all the ingredients for whatever I am cooking and place them on the tray (like you use to carry your plate at a school cafeteria). That is so I don’t drop something on the floor as I cut, open, stir, etc. Cutting, chopping is done by using the knuckles as a guide and sliding down through the meat or potatoes or whatever with my fingertips pulled back out of the way. It is still hard, but I only would scrape the knuckles a little as opposed to cutting a finger off.
In technology, they adjusted JAWS, a screen reader, to work with my FM system so I can hear it a little better. I hope now I can learn how to use it better. Some of you might remember my computer talking to me when you came to the school for finals or enrolling.
The coolest thing was finding out that I read Grade 1 Braille well enough to begin working with the Braille display. The Braille display looks sort of like a wrist board that some computers have. It sits under the regular keyboard with a part that extends out past the keyboard that has plastic bumps that fit through holes in the shape of the Braille cell that I showed earlier. Whatever is on the screen at the moment is shown in the Braille cells. In a short time because of my excellent teacher, Bill, I was going up and down a document reading various parts about the life of Helen Keller. I wonder why they use that document.
Another neat thing I did was in mobility. In addition to going out into the community to show them if Little Joe and I could maneuver safely on our own, they showed me how to get help as a deaf blind person alone. They give you a card that hangs around your neck with specific words and order of those words on it that you hold up when you want to cross the street. It says, “Please help me to cross the street. I am deaf blind.” The choice and order of words has been researched thoroughly. In fact, one of my instructors led the research recently for his Phd. dissertation . They found that if you said, “I am deaf blind,” first that it scared people away completely. If you put “Help me” first, people didn’t read far enough to see what the help was for and assumed you were asking for money. The current use of words was found to be the best to get people to be willing to help. After just a few minutes, a motorist actually stopped the car, got out, and asked to help me across the street. I thought it was a set up meaning a staff member who was waiting to show me how it worked, but no, it was an ordinary motorist who saw my card and thought I was completely alone. I have to admit that it was still a bit scary. The world is full of crazy people today.
For fun, I got to go to Shea Stadium and watch the NY Mets play. New Yawkers, as they call themselves, really take their baseball seriously. Most of the things I had heard about the NY fans seems true. They can be rowdy. It was fun. With each resident that went, an interpreter sat beside them and tactually signed to them and me what was going on during the game. Of course, they had to teach me some new signs at the same time to do this for me. It was very interesting. NY lost 10-9. In sign, the score is done by signing the numbers giving the winning score first and signing the home team or team that you are pulling for close to your heart. The other score is signed in front of you away from the chest. In other words, my interpreter signed the 10 in front of her away from her chest and then moved her hand to her heart and signed the 9. That was a new idea for me. It is amazing how in the way they do signs it gives so much information.Shea Stadium- baseball game from way up high
I didn’t get to take Little Joe to the game with me. They felt he would not be safe and would get too nervous. He stayed at the school in the office with personnel. They fed him treats and played with him with his toys all night. They really love Joe here. He gets more attention than any of the other guide dogs. He is truly spoiled. He even gets his own bed in my room.
I get to go to church tomorrow. The subject of religion up here has been a bit touchy. I have gotten tremendous help on every other subject, but going to church is like , “uh, we will see what we can do…, but I don’t know.” I guess that is because it is hard to get volunteers from outside for taking me to church. The staff is wonderful and really try. Well, tomorrow, staff is plentiful, so they have agreed to get staff to drop me off at a United Methodist Church about 5 minutes from the school. They will pick me up after church. I am a little nervous because I won’t know how to get around, and I don’t know how these people will know how to help me. I will trust the Lord to send me the helpful people. In addition, as I speak about religion at this point, I have to say I have gotten into “trouble” already. Most of you know that speaking of God, Jesus, how my faith sustains me, etc. just rolls out. I don’t preach or anything, and I don’t really witness except by example, I hope. However, in the Usher’s Syndrome support group that I have to attend on Monday afternoons, they asked if we had accepted our Usher’s, and if so how had we arrived at that point. I kept quiet until they specifically asked me to share. I am not ashamed, so I began with I believe that there is a God who is greater than I and that He has sifted everything that life and/or Satan wishes to throw into our path. If He has decided that I should face certain trials, then I know from experience and His word that it is for His glory and my benefit. I can handle all things through Christ who strengthens me. I then went on saying that it was still hard at times and how I have many family members and friends who support me. In other places, they also ask you a lot of questions to get to know you. Many times the questions of how are you coping, how are you handling these things, etc. come up. In a conversation with one lady, and I don’t remember who. She told me that we are supposed to leave religion and politics out of conversations here. I responded with the fact that I am not going up to residents or staff and trying to convert them. I was asked my feelings and thoughts, so I gave them. I will not respond with anything other than the truth. My faith is a big part of who I am, and I could not change that even if I wanted to do so. Of course, I understand the policy, and it is necessary in a place like this for the protection of residents, other staff and myself. The lady was not angry at all, and it was just a be aware kind of thing, so it didn’t bother me at all.
Well, Little Joe wants to go play in the dog run, and I need to walk my 3 miles. I will tell you more of my adventures another time. Keep praying for us.

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